Max Size: 4.5cm

Santa Maria Endler (Poecilia Wingei)

Santa Maria Endlers are very peaceful, hardy, and an active species with unique colouring. These Endlers have no special requirements making them ideal for the beginner aquarist as well as a novelty for advanced aquarists.

Santa Maria Endlers, also known as Bleeding Heart Endlers, are suitable for the nano or well-planted community aquarium. You can house these fish with most other peaceful community species; however, you should avoid keeping these fish with larger, more aggressive species such as Cichlids, Tiger Barbs or any other fish species known to nip fins.

Santa Maria Endlers usually swim around the top level of an aquarium; however, you will also find them swimming in the middle and bottom levels when foraging for food or chasing females for courting.

Santa Maria Endlers are best kept in groups as they are pretty sociable; it will also make your aquarium look more natural.

Male Santa Maria Endlers display a dark, almost black colour on the top half of their body, contrasted with a reddish-orange colour on the lower part of their body. Their dorsal fin has some blueish-white colouring as well as some orangey-red colouring contrasted with some dark patterning. Their caudal fin shows the exact colour and some patterning at the base. These colours intensify when they are in spawning conditions.

Quick Facts
Scientific NamePoecilia Wingei
Other NamesBleeding Heart Endler
FamilyPoeciliidae
GenusPoecilia
OriginsVenezuela
TemperamentPeaceful
Aquarium LevelMiddle - Top
DifficultyBeginner
ShoalingYes
Best kept asGroups 5+
DietOmnivore
Reproductionlivebearer
Lifespan2 - 3 years
Water Parameters
Water TypeFreshwater
PH7.0 - 8.5
GH2 - 15
KH3 - 15
TDS50 - 150
Temperature
75 - 86℉
23.9 - 30℃
Santa Maria Endler
Santa Maria Endler
Santa Maria Endler
Santa Maria Endler
Santa Maria Endler

Videos

Santa Maria Endlers, Poecilia Wingei/Poecilia Reticulata Aquarium Fish Species Profile & Care Guide

Natural Habitat

Santa Maria Endlers have no natural habitat as they are a hybrid Endler. This species is a cross between a guppy and an Endler, which is accredited to the Japanese breeder Kenichiro Tamura.

From the common Guppy, this fish has inherited the more robust shape, especially of the females, while the caudal fin pattern and the smallness of the males come from the Endler heritage.

Other Endlers of interest

Black Bar Endler(Poecilia wingei)
Blue Star Endlers(Poecilia wingei)
El Tigre Endler(Poecilia wingei)
Staeck Endler(Poecilia wingei)
Yellow Tiger Endler(Poecilia wingei / Poecilia reticulata)

What to feed the Santa Maria Endler

Santa Maria Endlers feed on small insects, algae and plant matter in the wild; therefore, it would be better if you followed this as much as possible in the home aquarium. You can accomplish this by feeding them high-quality dried food such as flakes and granules alongside live and frozen foods such as Daphnia, Bloodworm and brine shrimp. These fish also appreciate vegetable supplements such as shelled peas or blanched spinach.

How to Sex the Santa Maria Endler

It is simple to distinguish a male from a female Santa Maria Endler. Males are relatively small, quite slim and have very vibrant colouri9ng and patterns. In contrast, females are much larger, plumper and very dull in colour compared to males.

Male
Female

How to Breed the Santa Maria Endler

Santa Maria Endlers are straightforward to breed as they are prolific breeders. Depending on their age and size, the females can give birth to anything up to 50 fry every 24 to 28 days.

It is recommended that you have more females than males to avoid constant harassment from the males. It is also beneficial if you have plenty of plants; that way, the fry has somewhere to hide to avoid being consumed by their parents or other fish if housed in a community tank.

You should initially feed the fry on baby brine shrimp, microworms, liquid fry food or crushed flakes, moving on to flakes, granules, daphnia and suchlike as they grow. The fry will develop quickly depending on how much you feed them and the temperature; then, they will start to show adult colouration between 5 and 8 weeks.

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Date Added: 31/07/2020 - Updated: 17/11/2021 03:32:08