Peacock Gudgeon (Tateurndina Ocellicauda) Fish Species Profile

The Peacock Gudgeon is an amazingly attractive, peaceful and unique freshwater fish. Not only do they look amazing, but they are hardy and easy to look after. They do not need certain conditions that are challenging to maintain, and they get along with plenty of other species making them a great member of the community aquarium.

These fish have elongated bodies. Their heads are rounded, and adult males can develop a nuchal hump on the forehead, making that round shape even more pronounced.

They have a blueish-silvery body and display pink, black and yellow marks along the body, and the fins have a bright yellow thick edge. Females also have a thinner strip of black on top of the yellow portion of the fins.

The sides of their body sport red dotted stripes that run vertically down the entire length of the fish and they have a yellow abdomen. On either side of the body, there is a single, large black spot at the base of the caudal fin, and this distinct characteristic gives them the peacock name.

Profile
Scientific NameTateurndina Ocellicauda
Other NamesPeacock Goby
FamilyEleotridae
GenusTateurndina
OriginsAsia
TemperamentPeaceful
Aquarium LevelBottom - Middle
DifficultyBeginner - Intermediate
ShoalingNo
Best kept asGroups 6+
DietOmnivore
ReproductionEgg-Layer
Lifespan4 - 5 years
Maximum Sizeup to 7.5 cm
Water Conditions
Water TypeFreshwater
Temperature72 - 79 ℉ (22.2 - 26.1 ℃)
PH6.0 - 7.8
GH5 - 12

Origins

Peacock Gudgeons are endemic to the eastern part of Papua New Guinea. You can also find them throughout Australia and New Zealand.

They inhabit soft and acidic waters in lowland, slow-moving streams, rivers, or shallow still ponds that are warm and loaded with dense vegetation.

Diet

It is very challenging to feed the peacock gudgeons as they are very picky eaters. Some hobbyists have been successful when providing them with high-quality dried food, but this species almost always prefer live or frozen foods.

You can attempt to give them dry food to see if your fish like it. However, it is recommended to supplement that diet with live food such as bloodworms, daphnia and brine shrimp, as they are all excellent choices and will help your fish to maintain health and their colours and will keep them happy.

Sexing the Peacock Gudgeon

It is relatively simple to determine which fish are male or female.

The males will be somewhat more colourful, they will develop a large nuchal hump on their foreheads, and will be slightly more extensive than the females. The females will have a more vividly coloured yellow belly and display a black bar running along the edges of their anal fins. The females also have a more contoured body shape compared to the round body shape seen in males.

Breeding the Peacock Gudgeon

Peacock Gudgeons are relatively easy to breed. These fish usually form a connection and create partners quickly. If you have a group of fish, identify a couple and move them to a separate breeding tank.

The breeding tank will need to contain some caves or similar. You can use an artificial cave a simple PVC pipe or a terracotta pot.

To induce the breeding process, you will need to perform a profound water change and provide your couple with a sufficient amount of protein-rich live and frozen food. When the males are ready to breed, they will display a dancing ritual for the female swimming around the entrance of the cave and flash his pectoral fins.

If the female accepts him, she will swim into the cave and lay around 50 to 100 eggs. The eggs are adhesive so that she may lay them on the sides of the cave or the ceiling. After she has finished laying, she will leave.

At this time, the male will take over, fertilise the eggs and care for them as they incubate. You can see him fanning the eggs and defending the area frantically.

Around 8 to 10 days later, the eggs will start to hatch. The male may stick around for a while to make sure the small fry consume the yolk sack. However, most will leave and let the fry fend for themselves.

Once this has finished, you can remove the male and female adult fish from the tank.

Peacock Gudgeon fry grow relatively slowly. You will need to feed them with infusoria or powdered food until they are big enough to eat baby brine shrimp. It will take several weeks until they can swim freely, so keep a careful eye and implement a constant supply of food to help them grow.

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Date Added: 9/15/2020 - Updated: 9/15/2020 10:59:46 PM