Bronze Corydoras (Corydoras Aeneus) Fish Species Profile

The Bronze Corydoras is a small, peaceful freshwater catfish that has become quite popular in the home aquarium. This species of fish is easy to care for and are incredibly hardy but can be somewhat shy. They are incredibly eye-catching because of the variety of body colours they possess, and they are fascinating.

They sport an elongated body, an arched back and have a short, rounded snout. This fish has two pairs of barbels present on their jaws which expand nearly up to the gill slits.

The Bronze Corydoras displays a yellow, crimson body with a whitish belly and a grey-blue back. The body flank is usually greenish, and the fins are pinky-red or yellow, and just before the dorsal fin, an orangy brown design is seen on the head.

Like all Corydoras, this species is protected with overlaying scales known as scutes or plates. Their dorsal fin has one spine with seven soft rays while the anal fin bears 1-2 spines with 5-6 soft rays. The caudal fin is forked, and an additionally pointed barb is present in the pectoral, dorsal, and adipose fins.

Profile
Scientific NameCorydoras Aeneus
Other NamesBrown Cory, Bronze catfish, Gold Lazer Cory, Light Spot Corydoras, Bronze Cory, green Corydoras
FamilyCallichthyidae
GenusCorydoras
OriginsSouth America
TemperamentPeaceful
Aquarium LevelBottom
DifficultyBeginner - Intermediate
ShoalingYes
Best kept asTrios
DietOmnivore
ReproductionEgg-Layer
Lifespan5 - 10 years
Maximum Sizeup to 7 cm
Water Conditions
Water TypeFreshwater
Temperature75 - 80 ℉ (23.9 - 26.7 ℃)
PH6.0 - 7.5
GH8 - 12

Origins

The Bronze Corydoras can be found in Argentina, Columbia, Venezuela and Trinidad to the Rio de la Plata Basin on the Eastern side of the Andes, in South America. They inhabit quiet, shallow, slow-moving rivers and streams where soft muddy bottoms are present.

This species has a unique ability to breath air from the water's surface, making this one of the very few fish that are able to thrive in stagnant water.

Diet

Bronze Corydoras will accept almost anything you feed them but to sustain them in good health a variety of foods should be offered. Things like flake food, to frozen or freeze-dried foods such as daphnia, blackworms, brine shrimp and bloodworms. Because these fish are bottom feeders sinking algae pellets and catfish pellets are also advisable.

Sexing the Bronze Corydoras

It is comparatively hard to distinguish between the male and female Bronze Corydoras. Generally, the female is larger has a slimmer body, and are far less colourful than the male also the females have a higher body frame than the males alongside their more significant abdominal region.

Breeding the Bronze Corydoras

Spawning Bronze Corydoras is relatively easy. Before breeding, they should be conditioned with fresh or frozen bloodworms and brine shrimp and high-quality flake food.

The water should be slightly acidic. Rainwater is often used. You will then need to do a 50% water change with colder water than the breeding tank, and this will usually trigger spawning. If you find this unsuccessful, then duplicating rain by slowly adding water to the tank with some sprinkler motion will usually work.

The Bronze Corydoras becomes very lively during courting. Males will pursue females throughout the aquarium at a swift pace, stopping to rub their bodies and barbels against the female whenever the opportunity emerges. Once the female consents, he will search for suitable egg-laying sites and begin cleaning several fitting locations. As the courting progresses, roles ultimately reverse, and the female starts seeking the male.

Spawning begins when the pair seizes the classic T position. This position triggers the release of sperm as well as one to 10 eggs, which the female will grip with the pelvic fins.

Once fertilised, the female will deposit the eggs at the site that has been previously cleaned. The eggs are sticky and will adhere securely to the nesting site. This ritual will continue for several days with the female releasing a few eggs at a time until all the eggs have gone this can be up to 300 eggs.

Once the spawning is complete, you should remove the adults from the tank, or move the eggs to a grow-out tank, so they do not get eaten by the parents. Eggs are usually translucent, but they will darken as they develop.

After approximately four to five days the eggs will start to hatch, they will then feed off the yolk sac for an additional three to four days until they have consumed it. You will then need to provide the fry with very fine powdered food or infusoria.

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Date Added: 9/7/2020 - Updated: 9/7/2020 11:04:21 AM